Coffee is bad for you, right?

coffee

Actually no. Coffee is fantastic!  2-5 cups per day can help you in many ways:

  1. Coffee is high in antioxidants. Antioxidants help boost the immune system, improve the arterial function and help the stress response.
  2. Coffee boosts exercise performance. In endurance events, you can go for longer at a higher intensity before getting tired if you drink coffee prior to competing ion an event.
  3. Drinking coffee before lifting weights, will enable you to lift more and experience less muscle soreness after.
  4. Coffee is also great for the liver. You can cut your risk for liver disease in half by drinking two to five cups of unsweetened coffee per day.

Please note that is important to stop drinking coffee by 2pm to ensure that it does not disrupt the body’s natural rhythm and sleep patterns.

How to recover more quickly after strenuous exercise

strenuous-exercise

Performing strenuous exercise (tennis, squash, lifting weights, spinning etc) causes small tears and micro damage to your muscles. Over the subsequent hours and days your body works to repair this damage. The repair process results in your muscles becoming stronger.

This repair process can be accompanied by muscle soreness. Here are three dietary suggestions for you to try that will assist in your recovery and reduce any soreness in the muscles:

 

  1. Protein and amino acids are required to give the body the building blocks it needs to start the repair process. Within 15 minutes of finishing any strenuous exercise, try and enjoy a protein shake or a protein bar.
  2. Muscle soreness (inflammation) can be reduced by adding good quality anti-inflammatory foods to your diet. These include:
  • turmeric
  • fenugreek
  • garlic
  • ginger
  • omega 3 oils

 

  • Reducing the risk of tissue damage during strenuous exercise can be achieved by increasing your intake of the following:
  • watermelon
  • berries
  • watercress
  • dark chocolate
  • tomatoes

Benefits of eating Fibre

fiber

  • How much fibre do you eat every day? Most people are not eating enough.
  • Average fibre consumption is around 15g per day, but the ideal diet contains over 100g per day and anything below 32g is considered deficient.
  • So why is fibre important? Fibre is a prebiotic, meaning it feeds the helpful bacteria in your gut. These bacteria ensure that you are digesting your food properly and extracting the nutrients efficiently. They can also reduce inflammation and cancer risk, and positively regulate your mood.
  • Fibre is also important to maintain a healthy level of cholesterol. Excess cholesterol passes from the blood into the digestive tract where it can bind to soluble fibre. It is then removed in your stool. In the absence of fibre in the digestive tract, the cholesterol passes back into the blood stream, where it can contribute to weight gain and attach to the inside of the arteries, increasing cardiac risk in the long term.
  • The best sources of dietary fibre are whole plant foods, in particular, oats, flax seeds, chia seeds, quinoa, beans, avocado, coconut, artichoke, figs, almonds, walnuts, asparagus, okra, squash, peas, pears, berries and mangoes.
  • You should aim to eat over 35-40g of fibre each day.

Preventing Diabetes

diabetes

  • Did you know the worldwide prevalence of diabetes is increasing?

 

  • In 2014 The number of adults living with diabetes was 422 million. That is 8.5% of the global population!

 

  • Diet and lifestyle changes, such as cutting down on sugar, eating more beans and supplementing your diet with vinegar, can massively help to reduce the risk of diabetes.

 

Alcohol intake in our society

Written by Patricia Patterson-Vanegas

Alcohol is the third largest risk factor for ill health in the European Union and Europe has the highest unit per person intake of alcohol in the world*. Medical research has established that binge drinking and long-term drinking negatively affect most organs including the cardio-vascular system, the brain, liver and pancreas. It is also known that excessive alcohol contributes to many serious health conditions and has been shown to burden the immune
5978335-teen-alcohol-addiction-drunk-teens-with-vodka-bottlesystem and promote cancer.
Unfortunately, in the western culture, physical reactions such as ‘throwing-up’, headache, general malaise and even temporary loss of consciousness have been normalised as humorous consequences of an excessive intake of alcohol, and not recognised as the body’s urgent attempt to counter intoxication. Alcohol intake can have a damaging effect on the health and wellbeing of individuals and families.

4774971-drunk-man-lying-on-the-floor-at-home-with-many-empty-bottles

 

Interestingly, research conducted by Age UK** suggests that middle class people over the age of 50 not only consume greater levels of alcohol but also fail to recognise the harm that increasing alcohol consumption can cause.

 

*   The need for an EU strategy to reduce healthcare costs related to alcohol use (2015), published online by the journal BJM – www.dryoutnow.com/blog
** Harmful Drinking Among Middle-Class, Over-50s: The Hidden Phenomenon, Age    UK (2015) published online by the journal BJM Open. www.dryoutnow.com/blog

http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/Hangovers/beyondHangovers.htm